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Archive for the ‘recipes’ Category

Here’s the recipe as tweeted:layers

The sauce: crush celery seed, oregano, mint, ginger, coriander, raisins, honey, vinegar, oil, wine. And…this one is going to take 280.

The rest: In a clay baking dish put down layers of bread, cooked chicken breasts, pine nuts, diced onion, sharp cheese, sauce. Cover & bake.

For 6 boneless (raw) chicken breasts I used:

  • 2 tsp celery seeds
  • 6 tsp oregano
  • 3 TBSP mint (you may prefer less, but I like to go heavy on the mint)
  • 2 tsp coriander
  • 1-1/2 tsp ginger
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 4 tsp honey
  • 4 tsp vinegar
  • 4 tsp white cooking wine
  • more white cooking wine, because the bottle was right there
  • 2 cups pine nuts (in my opinion, you can’t have too much, for this recipe)
  • 3 rolls of bread with sturdy crust (I used par-baked rolls), sliced lengthwise in thirds
  • 8 thick slices of sharp cheddar (enough to cover the chicken on each layer)
  • 5 chopped shallots
  • pepper for garnish, if desired
  • surprisingly, no fermented fish sauce
  • I forgot the olive oil…probably because it was two in the morning…

herbsshallotsbread and raisins
Pound together the first six ingredients with the honey, vinegar, and wine. I layered the bread, chicken, sauce, shallots, and pine nuts (two layers fit the pot nicely) and cooked in a lidded Romertopf—soaked in water while I was at work, then placed in a cold oven, temperature set to 450F, and baked for about an hour and a quarter. An hour would probably have been enough, but I’m paranoid about cooking chicken thoroughly. After removing it from the oven, I let it sit in the clay baker for another 15 minutes.

Stray observation: I probably should have saved some of the sauce to pour (before cooking) over the top layer of bread, which came out crusty. Another alternative would be to cube the top layer of bread like stuffing (which is essentially what the other layers become). A variant on the recipe calls for layers of cucumbers as well and chilling the casserole and serving it jellied, which is a very different effect. Also one hard that’s to create if you don’t have snow handy in your ancient kitchen.

patinaapiciana_7finalAnd now I’m too sleepy to eat more than a few bites, so I’ll leave you with a picture of the results…

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Roman Chicken

Two in the morning and the Chicken à la Apicius is in the oven.

I should probably set the alarm clock.

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ApothermumThe results of the Apothermum recipe. If you missed the tweet, here’s the recipe in 140:

boil spelt grains w/pine nuts & bleached almonds into a pudding; add raisins & sweet wine, sprinkle nuts over, dust w/white pepper

I used 3 TB spelt flour, a half cup each of pine nuts and almonds. I ground the nuts and mixed them and the flour with about 2 cups water, which turned out to be a little too much. Stirred over a low flame at a simmer for about a half hour, then mixed in a cup of raisins and 1/3 cup sweet cooking wine. Stirred and simmered a while longer, adding a little more flour, until it was an acceptable porridge. Spooned into bowl, garnished with raisins and a dusting of white pepper.

Serves 2 Romans, or 4 who only feel snacky.

My sweet tooth wants to drizzle honey over it. If a Roman couldn’t reasonably pour fermented fish sauce over a dish, honey was often the next choice, so I think that’s acceptable. (I paired it with a refreshing cup of posca—water and wine vinegar. I opted out of the option to add honey and coriander to taste and went with the simpler soldier’s version.)

This is far too simple a dish for Cook in Knife of Narcissus to serve. She’d send master Bassus into the kitchen to make it himself.

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I’m returning to the ancient Roman recipes today, and will be in the kitchen playing with some simple ones. Eventually I’ll try something elaborate, since, as Martial might sniffingly say,

Knowing how to cook is not enough to be a cook
One cannot have the tastes of a slave
But must possess the palate of a master

I’ll be out back convincing a thousand larks to give up their tongues in the name of fine cuisine.

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